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Farm to Fork

Published: 15/04/2014

Flintshire and Perth Y Terfyn join the growing number schools in UK to take part in nationwide programme to learn where their food comes from. Children from Perth Y Terfyn in Flintshire swapped their classroom for the supermarket aisle on a visit to Tesco Holywell to take part in a Farm To Fork Trail, in a quest to find out more about the food on their plate and how it gets there. Backed by Diabetes UK, the Children’s Food Trust and the NFU amongst others, Farm To Fork is the first initiative of Tesco’s Eat Happy Project, a major new food education programme that is committed to improving children’s relationship with food. Offered to every primary school in the UK, Farm To Fork will see food suppliers across the country opening their farms and factories to teach kids how, for example, milk is produced, where eggs come from and how lettuce grows. Specially trained colleagues in more than 700 Tesco stores across the UK will also be teaching children about different foods and giving practical demonstrations, for example, baking bread, tasting new fruits and vegetables and learning all about fish. Tesco’s ambition is to give one million primary school children in the UK opportunity to go on the trails in the project’s first year to support their syllabus in learning about food, farming and nutrition. On their trail, pupils aged four from Perth Y Terfyn were treated to an interactive learning session behind the scenes in the warehouse, at the fish counter and in the fresh produce section to see first-hand and up close the fresh fish and fruit and vegetables. Mrs Yvonne Barker Head teacher at Perth Y Terfyn said: “Staff and pupils found the experience very worthwhile. The sessions were planned and paced exactly to the needs of our children. The staff were friendly and approachable. We were very impressed with the whole experience, it certainly was an insight into how our food gets from the field to the trolley! The fact that we are able to visit our local Tesco is a bonus and has certainly helped us consolidate our Eco and Healthy Schools work.” Councillor Chris Bithell, Flintshire County Council’s Cabinet Member for Education said: “Flintshire supports the Tesco Eat Happy initiative as it meets the objectives for teaching primary school children the provenance of food. It is important that children are educated about food at an early age so they can make the right choices and lead a healthy, happy life. As a Council we are committed to offering healthy school meal choices and this is another way of promoting eating well.” The Tesco Eat Happy Project launches as research from the Future Foundation reveals 90 per cent of 7-14 year olds do not eat their five-a-day. In fact, despite claiming they know what constitutes a healthy diet, 52 per cent think that potatoes count as one of their five-a-day, 16 per cent think orange squash counts and one in 10 per cent think carrot cake and ketchup count. And the generation gap is growing; the study also highlights the concerns British parents have about their kids’ relationship with food: two-thirds believe children eat much more convenience food than they did and an overwhelming eighty per cent say their kids are less healthy than they were as children. Carole Barford, Customer Services Manager at Tesco Holywell said: “It was a pleasure having Perth Y Terfyn attend our Farm to Fork trail today. The aim of these trails is to inspire primary school children all over the country to learn more about the food on their plate and you could see that the kids today were really excited and enthusiastic. We look forward to welcoming more schools in the area to come and experience a trail for themselves.” The second phase of Farm To Fork, to launch later in the year, will involve cookery courses for kids in stores, working with the Children’s Food Trust. Tesco stores and suppliers are opening their doors to every primary school in Flintshire to take part in Farm To Fork trails. Schools can search for their nearest store and supplier and register their interest now at www.eathappyproject.com Photo caption: Pupils from Perth Y Terfyn with Laura England from Flintshire County Council. Notes to editors Farm To Fork is a commitment to improving children’s relationship with food by providing every primary school in the UK access to a range of tools: · Specially trained colleagues in more than 700 Tesco stores across the UK teaching children about different foods and giving practical demonstrations, for example baking bread, tasting new fruits and vegetables and learning all about fish. · Food suppliers across the country opening their farms and factories to teach kids how, for example, milk is produced, where eggs come from and how lettuce grows. · A dedicated website with lesson plans, recipes and “how to” videos for children, parents and teachers. 1. The Future Foundation report, “The Current State of Kids’ Health: The Nutrition Gap”, was commissioned by Tesco with research carried out between August and September 2013. 2. Tesco is committed to using its scale for good in order to make a positive difference to some of the biggest challenges facing the world. Tesco has set three big ambitions in areas where it can make a real contribution and create value for society as a whole: creating opportunities for young people; helping and encouraging customers and colleagues to lead healthier lives; and leading in reducing food waste globally. To read more about these ambitions, visit the Tesco plc website.


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